Cuba facing its future 4. Viñales and the Sierra de los Organos

My favorite pin-up. Nikon D810, 32 mm (24-120.0 ƒ/4) 1/160" ƒ/11.0 ISO 400

My favorite pin-up. Nikon D810, 32 mm (24-120.0 ƒ/4) 1/160″ ƒ/11.0 ISO 400

Declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1999, the Viñales Valley is distinguished by a fertile soil, ideal for tobacco growth, karstic outcrops covered with vegetation, and a bucolic atmosphere. All this is sheltered by the quinta of the Sierra de los Organos, part of the Cordillera de Guaniguanico, that appears discretely in the background. Continue reading

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Cuba facing its future 3. Remedios and Cayo Santa Maria

An impromptu sand sculpture on the Las Gaviotes beach, on Cayo Santa Maria. Nikon D810, 24 mm (24.0 ƒ/1.4) 1/125" ƒ/10 ISO 64

An impromptu sand sculpture on the Las Gaviotas beach, on Cayo Santa Maria. Nikon D810, 24 mm (24.0 ƒ/1.4) 1/125″ ƒ/10 ISO 64

The road to Santa Clara

From Playa Ancon, we took the perilous road 152 that goes passed Trinidad, up  North, through the Topes de Collantes mountain range. We were heading to Santa Clara, for a quick visit to the Che Guevara Memorial. Continue reading

Cuba facing its future 2. Trinidad

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Everybody in this island and outside looks at Cuba’s future with a mix of expectation and worry. Some of its more characteristic features are in danger. Its famous vintage cars, to be sure, are doomed to disappear. But also less futile worries concern its delicate, untouched environment, menaced by a more conspicuous and ubiquitous  tourism. We visited South and West of the Habana to assess the state of the disease .
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Cuba facing its future 1. Habana

Vintage cars are a distinctive feature of Cuba and l'Habana is a showcase of these outdated items. Nikon D750, 400 mm (80-400.0 mm ƒ/4.5-5.6) 1/320" ƒ/10 ISO 100

Vintage cars are a distinctive feature of Cuba and l’Habana is a showcase of these outdated items. Nikon D750, 400 mm (80-400.0 mm ƒ/4.5-5.6) 1/320″ ƒ/10 ISO 100

If you don’t like to wait, just don’t go to Habana. Most businesses there are  owned by the State and you’ll find yourself constantly dealing with civil servants who have a  job guaranteed and just have no idea how things happen in a capitalistic society based on time and competition. Basically, they don’t give a s**t. Continue reading